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URGENT: You can help stop illegal wildlife trade

If you’re like me, you get a lot of correspondence. But recently I received something that stopped me in my tracks. When you read it, you’ll see why.

It’s a letter from a 12-year-old boy named Jack, alerting me to a website allegedly selling live tigers. I’ve included a copy of his heartfelt letter below for you to see.

Jacks letter

Rest assured that I’ve investigated (thankfully the site is a hoax) but I commend Jack for his passion for conservation and taking action to alert WWF.

Can you imagine that Jack’s generation could be the last to see a tiger in the wild? With just 3,200 wild tigers remaining worldwide, the possibility of their extinction in Jack’s lifetime is frighteningly real.

Right now, endangered species like tigers, rhinos and elephants are being illegally hunted day and night all across the globe. The reason? Their skins, bones, horns, tusks and other body parts fetch a small fortune on the black market.

© naturepl.com / Edwin Giesbers / WWF-Canon

© naturepl.com / Edwin Giesbers / WWF-Canon

The sad truth is that these and other animals may be worth more dead than alive to poachers and smugglers – but I’m sure you agree that saving endangered species is a cause worth fighting for. With your support, illegal wildlife trade can be stopped.

We owe it to these incredible animals – and we owe it to children like Jack. I don’t want him to live in a world where species like tigers and rhinos have gone extinct. If you feel the same way, I urge you to support this critical effort today.

What WWF is doing:

 

WWF-Canada’s TRAFFIC Program is doing all it can to educate, impact and change the future to STOP rhinos from being butchered for their horns and left to die slowly and painfully, to STOP tigers from being killed for their pelts and to STOP elephants from being slaughtered for their tusks. To bring an end to this horrific practice, we need your continued support today.

How you can help:

 

Please help stop illegal wildlife trade. Donate now.

Support WWF’s work such as the tiger conservation programme and adopt a tiger!

Tiger


  • Brian Mcluckie

    Thank goodness there are concerned youth like Jack who realise that this is very wrong.