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13 countries where you can find wild tigers

The wild tiger population has dropped 97% over the last hundred years, making them an endangered species. The TX2 campaign is a global commitment to double the number of wild tigers made by the governments of 13 tiger range countries. Take a spin around these 13 countries where wild tigers can still be found and where we hope this amazing species can continue to thrive.

 1.  Bangladesh

Bangladesh is conducting its first national survey in the challenging Sundarbans where tigers swim between dense mangroves. This female is part of a research study and is wearing a radio collar.

Bangladesh is conducting its first national survey in the challenging Sundarbans where tigers swim between dense mangroves. © naturepl.com / Tim Laman / WWF-Canon

© naturepl.com / Tim Laman / WWF-Canon

2.  Vietnam

Anecdotal information suggests there are few tigers in Vietnam. In 2010, the government estimated the population to be very low. An updated figure is needed.

necdotal information suggests there are few tigers in Vietnam. In 2010, the government estimated the population to be very low. An updated figure is needed. © Choong Joon LAI / WWF-Greater Mekong

© Choong Joon LAI / WWF-Greater Mekong

 3.  Cambodia

This is the last tiger photographed in Cambodia. It was taken in 2007, by camera trap in Mondulkiri Protected Forest. Lack of tiger signs suggests tigers are very rare in Cambodia.

This is the last tiger photographed in Cambodia. It was taken in 2007, by camera trap Mondulkiri Protected Forest. Lack of tiger signs suggests tigers are very rare in Cambodia. © Cambodia WWF/FA

© Cambodia WWF/FA

4.  India

India’s first national survey in 2006 counted 1411 tigers. Four years later 1706 tigers were counted. The 2014 national census is currently underway.

India's first national survey in 2006 counted 1411 tigers. Four years later 1706 tigers were counted. The 2014 national census is currently underway. © Vivek R. Sinha / WWF-Canon

© Vivek R. Sinha / WWF-Canon

  5.  Bhutan

Bhutan is conducting its first national tiger survey. Researchers started setting camera traps on the King’s birthday in the south and are now moving north.

Bhutan is conducting its first national tiger survey. Researchers started setting camera traps on the King’s birthday in the south and are now moving north. © R.Isotti, A.Cambone - Homo Ambiens / WWF-Canon

© R.Isotti, A.Cambone – Homo Ambiens / WWF-Canon

6. Thailand

In Thailand, tigers live in protected areas. Numbers are known in many areas, but not all. Government support is needed for an updated figure.

In Thailand, tigers live in protected areas. Numbers are known in many areas, but not all. Government support is needed for an updated figure © Morgan Hillsman / WWF-Greater Mekong

© Morgan Hillsman / WWF-Greater Mekong

7.  Indonesia

Surveying tigers through the dense jungles of the Sumatra is challenging. This female Sumatran tiger was captured by camera trap in Rimbang Baling-Bukit Tigapuluh Corridor. NGOs are working to count tigers, but urgently need government support for a national survey.

Surveying tigers through the dense jungles of the Sumatra is challenging. NGOs are working to count tigers, but urgently need government support for a national survey. © WWF-Indonesia / Tiger Survey Team

© WWF-Indonesia / Tiger Survey Team

8.  Laos

Anecdotal information suggests there are a few or no breeding female tigers left in Laos. In 2010 the government said there were 17. An updated figure is needed.

Anecdotal information suggests there are a few or no breeding female tigers left in Laos. In 2010 the government said there were 17. An updated figure is needed. © CK Wong / WWF-Greater Mekong

© CK Wong / WWF-Greater Mekong

9.  China

The largest of the tiger sub-species, the Amur tiger is found in two provinces in the Russian Far East and small pockets in the border areas of China. China is planning to conduct tiger surveys in the North-East. Tigers are likely extinct in other parts of the country.

China is planning to conduct tiger surveys in the North-East near the Russian border. Tigers are likely extinct in other parts of the country. © Klein & Hubert / WWF

© Klein & Hubert / WWF

10.  Malaysia

Malay Peninsula occupies the southern end of the distribution of the Indo-Chinese tiger and supports substantial populations of the subspecies. Malaysia’s tiger population has never been thoroughly counted, only roughly estimated. A national survey is critically needed.

Malaysia’s tiger population has never been thoroughly counted, only roughly estimated. A national survey is critically needed. © Gerald S. Cubitt / WWF-Canon

© Gerald S. Cubitt / WWF-Canon

 11.  Russia

Russia conducts site-specific tiger surveys every year and national surveys every 10 years. The first survey was in 2005, the next will be in 2015.

Russia conducts site-specific tiger surveys every year and national surveys every 10 years. The first survey was in 2005, the next will be in 2015. © Hartmut Jungius / WWF-Canon

© Hartmut Jungius / WWF-Canon

 12.  Nepal

Nepal conducted its first national survey in 2012, releasing the results on Global Tiger Day 2013. Tiger numbers had gone up over 60% to 198 total.

Nepal conducted its first national survey in 2012, releasing the results on Global Tiger Day 2013. Tiger numbers had gone up over 60% to 198 total. © Gerald S. Cubitt / WWF-Canon

© Gerald S. Cubitt / WWF-Canon

13.  Myanmar

Anecdotal information suggests tigers still exist in Myanmar. Surveys are needed to know the national tiger population.

Anecdotal information suggests tigers still exist in Myanmar. Surveys are needed to know the national tiger population © Kabir Backie / WWF-Greater Mekong

© Kabir Backie / WWF-Greater Mekong

Learn more about WWF’s global TX2 campaign to double wild tiger populations.

Celebrate Global Tiger Day by symbolically adopting a tiger today!


  • Kameron Christy

    I wish tigers weren’t treated like they don’t exist. I am glad WWF is trying to step in and stop thetigers from becoming extinct

  • Betty

    This morning I watched part of a documentary on TV, and it talked about a special kind of TIGER which lives in Canada !!! Why isn’t that mentioned ??

    And, I think it said there are only ..40 .. of them in the wild ! So, heading towards extinction.