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Hug a Tree! National Forest Week is coming soon

National Forest Week was established nearly 100 years ago as Forest Fire Prevention Week. Today, its goal is to encourage Canadians to get outside, explore the forests in their communities and meet the trees in their backyards and schoolyards! This year, National Forest Week is being celebrated September 21–27 and the week peaks with National Tree Day on Wednesday, September 24. National Tree Day celebrates all that trees provide: clean air, wildlife habitat, a reduction in energy demand and a beautiful environment for all.

© Good Shepherd School

© Good Shepherd School

A Grade 6 class at Good Shepherd School in Peace River, AB, took the goals of National Forest Week to heart, undertaking a massive tree replanting project in Harmon Valley Park. Teacher Scott Randall says that, “what used to be a beautiful place with an old-growth forest of towering pine trees was devastated by the pine beetle, and had to be clear cut.” The replanting of the park had already been started with a community project, Harmon Valley Evergreening. Scott, his Grade 6 students and some parent volunteers did their bit to help continue the work, planting donated seedlings from Alberta Sustainable Resources.

© Good Shepherd School

© Good Shepherd School

For ways your classroom can take part in National Forest Week, check out some of the links below!

Forests Alive — WWF’s curriculum-linked resource for Grade 3 classrooms.
Canada’s Trees and Forests — Learn about the parts of a tree, Canada’s forest regions, official tree emblems and much more.
Trees in Canada — Explore the wide variety of trees found in Canada and learn about greening your schoolyard.
Seeing the Forests and the Trees — Activities include paper-making, tree planting and tree ring analysis.
Nature is Our Home — WWF’s curriculum-linked resource for kindergarten classrooms.

WWF’s Schools for a Living Planet connects educators and students of all ages to WWF’s conservation work. Join the S4LP community and learn how you can inspire your classrooms and classmates to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature.