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Cities Go Wild with judge Matthew Blackett

This spring, WWF-Canada is inviting Canadians to Go Wild and share their best ideas for getting their community more involved in helping nature thrive. The top five ideas will be awarded a micro-grant of up to $1,000 to help bring their idea to life. To select the best projects, four notable nature lovers will be part of the jury. Matthew Blackett is one of our judges.

Matthew Blackett is the publisher, creative director and one of the founders of Spacing magazine. As publisher, Matthew has helped shape the magazine into one of Canada’s top small magazines. He has also recently been appointed as an advisor to Ryerson University’s City Builders Institute.

Matt Blackett

© Matt Blackett

When asked why WWF’s Go Wild focus on connecting people to nature was important, Matthew said:

“I love cities – but if a city doesn’t have nature, it doesn’t work. As the publisher of a magazine about urban life, I see the role that nature plays in peoples’ quality of life in the city. And I’ve become even more acutely aware of the value of wild spaces now that I’m a father. Without places to play, relax and breathe clean air we wouldn’t be so in love with the city.”

Matthew is a well-known proponent for nature in cities. From 2004 to 2006, he was a member of Toronto’s Roundtable on a Clean and Beautiful City, a citizen advisory committee to former mayor (now WWF-Canada President and CEO) David Miller. From 2006 to 2009 Matthew was a member of the board of directors for The Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation. He was also a citizen member of the City of Toronto’s Pedestrian Committee from 2006 to 2010, and a member of the board of directors of The Friends of Fort York from 2007 to 2014.

WWF-Canada is excited to welcome Matthew to Go Wild!

How will you Go Wild?

Tell us what makes you feel most connected to nature on Facebook and Twitter, using the hashtag #wwfgowild. And if you have an idea for a project to mobilize people in your community to help nature thrive, but you need a hand getting it off the ground, submit it to wwf.ca/gowild. All submissions will be evaluated and the five best projects will be selected to receive microgrants of up to $1,000.