WWF-Canada Blog:
Arctic


Arctic treasure gets a closeup. Here’s how to see it

Located at the eastern mouth of the fabled Northwest Passage, and cradled between the northwestern tip of Baffin Island and southern Devon Island, Lancaster Sound is a rarely visited Arctic hotbed of biodiversity. It is home to polar bears, narwhals, belugas, bowheads, walrus, seals, seabirds, fish and people.    

Now everyone has the opportunity to discover and explore this national treasure, its undeniable conservation value and the increasing pressures it faces. Visit wwf.ca/lancastersound to watch exclusive video footage, read the story behind the region and dive deep with interactive mapping features.  

Despite more than 30 years of action by local communities who rely on marine mammals and fish as a source of food, Lancaster Sound remains unprotected.

In the meantime, the region is experiencing the effects of climate change. People and species face rapidly melting sea ice and the development that comes with an ice-free Arctic.

Furthermore, ships transporting iron ore from a nearby mine add to the pressures on this sensitive marine environment.  And, just outside the government’s proposed national marine conservation area boundary, there are existing leases for offshore oil exploration.

Once you’ve explored the region thoroughly, share it with your friends and family. And, if you haven’t done so already, consider adding your voice to thousands of other Canadians urging our national leaders to make Lancaster Sound one of our country’s top marine priorities and designate it a National Marine Conservation Area.

Explore Lancaster Sound now.
Sign the petition now.
Find out more about WWF’s lawsuit against the oil leases on the proposed boundary of Lancaster Sound.

Two narwhal (Monodon monoceros) surfacing to breathe in Admiralty Inlet, Lancaster Sound, Nunavut, Canada. © Paul Nicklen/National Geographic Stock / WWF-Canada

Two narwhal (Monodon monoceros) surfacing to breathe in Admiralty Inlet, Lancaster Sound, Nunavut, Canada. © Paul Nicklen/National Geographic Stock / WWF-Canada