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Nine must-see highlights from WWF’s CN Tower Climb for Nature

More than 7,000 people registered to take Toronto’s tallest challenge and climb the 1,776 steps of Toronto’s most-famous landmark in WWF-Canada’s CN Tower Climb for Nature last weekend. This annual event, now in its 26th year, raised more than $1-million to support WWF-Canada’s conservation work. Here are nine must-see highlights from the weekend.

1. Fastest climb time: 10:54

CN Tower climbers left it all on the stairs to get to the top with their best time. © James Carpenter / WWF-Canada

CN Tower climbers left it all on the stairs to get to the top with their best time. © James Carpenter / WWF-Canada

2. Total raised: $1,196,626 and climbing!

Our climbers went above and beyond this year, bringing our fundraising to new heights. © James Carpenter/WWF

Our climbers went above and beyond this year, bringing our fundraising to new heights. © James Carpenter / WWF-Canada

3. Climbing Powerhouses: This year was our biggest ever with 7,234 registered climbers over Saturday and Sunday

Some of the youngest climbers were the most enthusiastic. © James Carpenter / WWF-Canada

Some of the youngest climbers were the most enthusiastic. © James Carpenter / WWF-Canada

4. Volunteer Superheroes: The 350+ volunteers, proudly sponsored by TELUS as part of WWF’s volunteer program, kept everything moving smoothly. This event would not be possible without their passion, dedication and professionalism.

TELUS sponsored volunteers kept cheering until the last climber reached the top. © Ty Nanayakkara / WWF-Canada

TELUS sponsored volunteers kept cheering until the last climber reached the top. © Ty Nanayakkara / WWF-Canada

5. Top fundraising teams: In the tightest race for top fundraising team that we’ve ever seen, Bentall Kennedy ($19,623) edged out Brookfield GIS ($16,571).

Bentall Kennedy celebrates post-climb. © Adrienne Lo / WWF-Canada

Bentall Kennedy celebrates post-climb. © Adrienne Lo / WWF-Canada

6. Corporate sustainability leadership: 46 Living Planet at Work teams collectively raised over $150,000

Corporate team from Brookfield GIS. © Amy Castator / WWF-Canada

Corporate team from Brookfield GIS. © Amy Castator / WWF-Canada

7. Most inspiring climber: Julian Backhouse, a 63-year-old-grandfather who uses a wheelchair, climbed the tower in one hour and eight minutes. Read this to learn how he does it.

Julian Backhouse (right) and WWF-Canada president and CEO David Miller. © Rebecca Spring / WWF-Canada

Julian Backhouse (right) and WWF-Canada president and CEO David Miller. © Rebecca Spring / WWF-Canada

8. Sweatiest summit: Members of Toronto Fire Services Local 3888 who climbed in bunker pants that weighed up to 20 lbs and aren’t breathable

Toronto Fire team is ready for their next challenge. © James Carpenter / WWF-Canada

Toronto Fire team is ready for their next challenge. © James Carpenter / WWF-Canada

9. Conservation leader of tomorrow: Ben Stewart, 9, raised $520 for conservation and won the Adventure Canada trip to Haida Gwaii for early-bird fundraisers.

Ben Stewart (front) and family. © Rebecca Spring / WWF-Canada

Ben Stewart (front) and family. © Rebecca Spring / WWF-Canada

A big thank you to our climbers, volunteers and donors that supported this event. Our work would not be possible without you. We hope you had as much fun as we did. Relive more exciting moments from the day by checking out more photos here.

A very special thanks to these sponsors for helping make the climb happen:climbsponsors

and prize sponsors MIDO, Fairmont Royal York, and Le Select Bistro. 


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